Video Tutorial of Sufia Theme

In this tutorial, we will show you step by step process of activating, installing and customize the Sufia News Blog Magazine Multipurpose WordPress Theme.

Part-1: Activating theme and installing plugins

 

In the next step, watch how to import demo contents. We will show you importing contents in parts.

Part-2: Importing demo Contents

After uploading the XML files, please wait 3-10 minutes to download all the images, posts, pages and navigation.

 

Part-3: Navigation Setup

Setting up navigation after importing demo contents

 

 

Part-4: Homepage Setup

Watch below video to learn how to setup homepage with widgets and featured panel.

 

FAQ

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[krown_accordion_section title=”I can not import demo contents. How can I deal with it?”] After installing and activating the theme, go to Tools > Import , install wordpress importer, then select the demo content XML file provided with package. after uploading, wait 10 minutes and see all the contents there. If you are unable to import all contents at once, use single XML files, those also provided in package, install posts, pages, media one by one. and it should work. [/krown_accordion_section]

[krown_accordion_section title=”Where are theme options ? How can I customize this theme?”] After installing and activating the theme, you will see a notification panel at the top. You need to install “Redux Framework” plugin from there. After activating , go to Appearance > Theme Options. There you can customize everything. [/krown_accordion_section]

[krown_accordion_section title=”I want to use adsense ad using this theme. Is it possible?”] Yes, its absolutely possible! Go to Appearance > Widgets > KT Code Banner. Place that widget in any widgetized area and place your adsense code. [/krown_accordion_section]

[krown_accordion_section title=”I want to show adsense ad beside logo?  I dont see any options, why?”] To use adsense code or any banner, we have made that area widgetized. Go to Appearance > Widgets > Header Banner (look at right bottom). Now drag the KT Code Banner here from left side and add your adsense code.  If you want to use image banner, then drag KT 728×90 Advertisement widget. Remember that, this area is for 728×90 banner only. Try to use banner within this width and height.[/krown_accordion_section]

[krown_accordion_section title=”How to make the sidebar fixed just like demo?”] Go to Settings > Theia Sticky Sidebar > General , then click on Show and put .raj-sidebar in the Sidebar CSS selector field . Please see below[/krown_accordion_section]

[/krown_accordion]

 

[krown_box] If there are more new issues you get, please create a topic in our forum. [/krown_box]

Hard Times

‘NOW, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir!’

The scene was a plain, bare, monotonous vault of a school-room, and the speaker’s square forefinger emphasized his observations by underscoring every sentence with a line on the schoolmaster’s sleeve. The emphasis was helped by the speaker’s square wall of a forehead, which had his eyebrows for its base, while his eyes found commodious cellarage in two dark caves, overshadowed by the wall. The emphasis was helped by the speaker’s mouth, which was wide, thin, and hard set. The emphasis was helped by the speaker’s voice, which was inflexible, dry, and dictatorial. The emphasis was helped by the speaker’s hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside. The speaker’s obstinate carriage, square coat, square legs, square shoulders, – nay, his very neckcloth, trained to take him by the throat with an unaccommodating grasp, like a stubborn fact, as it was, – all helped the emphasis. Continue reading Hard Times

David Copperfield

Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. To begin my life with the beginning of my life, I record that I was born (as I have been informed and believe) on a Friday, at twelve o’clock at night. It was remarked that the clock began to strike, and I began to cry, simultaneously.

In consideration of the day and hour of my birth, it was declared by the nurse, and by some sage women in the neighbourhood who had taken a lively interest in me several months before there was any possibility of our becoming personally acquainted, first, that I was destined to be unlucky in life; and secondly, that I was privileged to see ghosts and spirits; both these gifts inevitably attaching, as they believed, to all unlucky infants of either gender, born towards the small hours on a Friday night.

I need say nothing here, on the first head, because nothing can show better than my history whether that prediction was verified or falsified by the result. On the second branch of the question, I will only remark, that unless I ran through that part of my inheritance while I was still a baby, I have not come into it yet. But I do not at all complain of having been kept out of this property; and if anybody else should be in the present enjoyment of it, he is heartily welcome to keep it. Continue reading David Copperfield

Bleak House

London. Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth, and it would not be wonderful to meet a Megalosaurus, forty feet long or so, waddling like an elephantine lizard up Holborn Hill. Smoke lowering down from chimney-pots, making a soft black drizzle, with flakes of soot in it as big as full-grown snowflakes–gone into mourning, one might imagine, for the death of the sun. Dogs, undistinguishable in mire. Horses, scarcely better; splashed to their very blinkers. Foot passengers, jostling one another’s umbrellas in a general infection of ill temper, and losing their foot-hold at street-corners, where tens of thousands of other foot passengers have been slipping and sliding since the day broke (if this day ever broke), adding new deposits to the crust upon crust of mud, sticking at those points tenaciously to the pavement, and accumulating at compound interest. Continue reading Bleak House

Barnaby Rudge

In the year 1775, there stood upon the borders of Epping Forest, at a distance of about twelve miles from London–measuring from the Standard in Cornhill, or rather from the spot on or near to which the Standard used to be in days of yore–a house of public entertainment called the Maypole; which fact was demonstrated to all such travellers as could neither read nor write (and at that time a vast number both of travellers and stay-at-homes were in this condition) by the emblem reared on the roadside over against the house, which, if not of those goodly proportions that Maypoles were wont to present in olden times, was a fair young ash, thirty feet in height, and straight as any arrow that ever English yeoman drew. Continue reading Barnaby Rudge

A Tale of Two Cities

The Period

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way–in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. Continue reading A Tale of Two Cities

A Christmas Carol

MARLEY was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge’s name was good upon ‘Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to. Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Mind! I don’t mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country’s done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Scrooge knew he was dead? Of course he did. How could it be otherwise? Scrooge and he were partners for I don’t know how many years. Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend, and sole mourner. And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain. Continue reading A Christmas Carol